Muse: Putting the Koi to Bed for Winter

Putting the Koi to Bed for Winter

Flurries and freezing temperatures … what a difference a week makes. That’s my cue to cover the pond with plastic and put the Koi to bed for another Winter. Not so bad for them. Just one more sleep till Spring.

Music to suit: The Specials, Enjoy Yourself
(Source: YouTube, Scuba Kat)

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Muse: From Old-School Fish Tank to New-School Koi Pond

Koi in Backyard Pond

Shut down the old fish tank this week, which was probably a good idea, since it was 20 years old and starting to leak at the seams. Hard to imagine that’s the second tank I’ve retired. Guess that just means it’s time to focus on bigger and better things – like the Koi pond in the backyard and sharing it with all the thirsty critters in the neighbourhood. Fully interactive and social. Feels just about right for today.

Music to suit: Ernest Ranglin, Love and Happiness
(Source: YouTube, gurufuttlappele)

A Safe, Simple Way to Prepare your Backyard Pond, Koi and Goldfish for Winter

A well-planted, backyard water garden filled with fish is quite spectacular in the Summer. There’s nothing quite as therapeutic as getting lost in the sights and sounds of falling water, while Koi swim lazily between the Lily pads to greet you at the water’s edge … that is, until Fall arrives. Then it’s time to Winterize the pond and put your fish to bed for the Winter. And since they’re going to spend the entire Winter outside, it’s important to prepare Koi (Japanese for Carp) and Goldfish properly to ensure they wake up happy and healthy in Spring. Here’s the approach I use to close my pond every Fall. It’s an approach I’ve adapted from others who’ve written about their experiences, and so far, I haven’t lost a single fish yet.

Note: My pond is 8′ x 8′ x 2′ deep (with straight walls), in Zone 6 where temperatures can reach -10F (-23C) in Winter.

Fish Requirements in Fall-Winter

Koi and Goldfish are hearty species that can tolerate cold temperatures outside. In Fall, when the water temperature drops below 45F, fish will slow down, stop eating and become inactive. Continue reading